Planning Permission

Our best understanding of current legislation regarding garden buildings in the UK

Notes On Planning Permission

Outbuildings

Outbuildings are considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, provided all the conditions are met.

1. On designated land* outbuildings to the side of the house are not permitted development.

* Designated land includes national parks and the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, conservation areas and World Heritage Sites.

2. Outbuildings are not permitted development within the grounds of a listed building.

3. In national parks, the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and World Heritage Sites the total area to be covered by any outbuildings more than 20 metres from ANY WALL of the house must not exceed 10 square metres to be permitted development.

4. Outbuildings are not permitted development forward of the principal elevation of the original house. The term original house means the house as it was first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date).

5. Outbuildings and other additions must not exceed 50% of the total area of land around the original house. Sheds and all other outbuildings and extensions to the original house must be included when calculating this 50% limit.

6. To be permitted development, any new building must not itself be separate, self-contained, living accommodation and must not have a microwave antenna.

7. Outbuildings must be single storey with a maximum eaves height of 2.5 metres and maximum overall height of 4 metres with a dual pitched roof, or 3 metres in any other case.

8. If the outbuilding is within 2 metres of the property boundary the whole building should not exceed 2.5 metres in height.

This is our best understanding of English Planning Regulations for greenhouses and other garden buildings based on information from the Government’s planning portal website. This is shown for information only and must not be relied upon as legal advice. You must satisfy yourself that any work you have carried out meets the requirements of any relevant legislation.